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Norfolk County Council gets £3.5m pothole repair grant




County roads chiefs have appealed for patience as they battle to repair West Norfolk's potholes, despite receiving a multi-million pound pay out.
County roads chiefs have appealed for patience as they battle to repair West Norfolk's potholes, despite receiving a multi-million pound pay out.

County roads chiefs have appealed for patience as they battle to repair West Norfolk’s potholes, despite receiving a multi-million pound pay out.

Dozens of Lynn News readers have been taking to social media to share what they believe to be the area’s worst potholes following the recent snowfall.

Yesterday, Norfolk County Council was given the third largest portion of a £100 million government fund to repair potholes and protect roads from future severe weather.

The package, worth £3.5 million, is intended to fixroad damage caused by the Beast from the East.

Chairman of Norfolk County Council’s environment, development and transport committee, Martin Wilby said: “This money is extremely welcome.

“We have one of the longest road networks in the country to maintain in Norfolk and I’m really pleased the Government has recognised this with this funding award.”

But Lynn News readers responded in force to our Facebook appeal for the worst pothole spots and urged the council to get on with repairing scores of routes, including the A10, A149, B1144 and B1160.

On Facebook, Sophie Bilham said: “The A149 is shocking between the Queen Elizabeth Hospital and Jubilee roundabouts. Both sides too.”

Sam Harris said: “College Road B1160 to Wissington is absolutely horrific! With the amount of lorries down there there’s nowhere to go.”

“March Road, Tipps End, the side of the road is crumbling just before where the tanker went into the ditch,” said Ann Wardle.

And some social media users are worried other road users will assume they are drink-driving when they are merely attempting to dodge potholes along West Norfolk roads.

Heidi Whiting said: “People think I am drunk trying to avoid them. I feel sorry for the motorbikes.”

Michael Ridout said: “Most of the potholes are still around after the cold snap in 2010! And every cold snap we get, brings new ones.”

“Well taxes have gone up, no excuse not to get out there and start repairing,” said Tracy Ballard.

Mr Wilby said: “As we all know, it’s been a colder and snowier winter than we’ve had for a number of years and road surfaces have suffered as a result. We received more than double the number of pothole reports and enquiries in the first two and a half months of this year compared to last year.

“We had all hands to the deck during the Beast from the East clearing snow and gritting roads but ever since then we’ve had teams out solely focused on fixing potholes.

“I hope people understand this is a huge job and we’re trying to get through the backlog as quickly as we can.”

The council is planning how to make best use of the money, which they say is likely to be a mixture of reactive work by repairs and preventative work intended to extend the life of current road surfaces.

The county council is responsible for most roads in the county, though the A47 is maintained by Highways England.



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