Home   News   Article

Subscribe Now

H.C. Moss plans for two-bed home in Fakenham turned down due to pollution fears





A developer wanting to build a two-bed home in a cul-de-sac has lost its battle to get permission after falling foul of pollution laws.

The small house was the final property building firm H.C. Moss hoped to build on land in Fakenham off Garden Court.

It was to be constructed on a small parcel of land that was left over from the initial development of ten houses, which was approved by North Norfolk District Council (NNDC) a decade ago.

Garden Court in Fakenham. Picture: Google Maps
Garden Court in Fakenham. Picture: Google Maps

It was the third attempt to get permission after the previous two attempts were withdrawn and refused.

The bid drew the ire of residents who voiced their “grave concerns” to the council, which focused on fears that it would block out light for the surrounding homes as well as result in the loss of two cherry trees.

“Our quality of life would be hugely affected by such repercussions,” one neighbour warned.

A proposed design for the home. Picture: GC Design
A proposed design for the home. Picture: GC Design

NNDC officers chose to block the new build in 2022 for a number of reasons, which included concerns it would be too cramped and affect the neighbours.

But another major issue was that it would compromise nutrient neutrality laws – rules which aim to limit the effect of pollution from house building upon the environment – as the developer did not identify any mitigation measures.

Last summer, H.C. Moss took its fight to the Planning Inspectorate, the Government body that presides over planning appeals.

An agent for the firm argued the neighbours’ concerns were unjustified and that the new home would provide much-needed accommodation in the district.

The entrance to Garden Court in Fakenham. Picture: Google Maps
The entrance to Garden Court in Fakenham. Picture: Google Maps

They also argued that the environmental impact would be “negligible” as it is only a small home.

In the inspector’s judgement, it was decided that while it would help provide a new home, the conflict with nutrient neutrality laws gave justification for the refusal.

They also agreed that the new build would cut out the light to neighbouring properties.



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More