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Queen Elizabeth Hospital boss states special measures end date target




Lynn’s hospital will be out of special measures by the end of the 2021 summer according to its chief executive.

Inspectors said there was “little evidence” of improvement after a Care Quality Commission inspection took place over several weeks during March and April.

The commission had originally placed the hospital into special measures last September.

The main entrance at Lynn's Queen Elizabeth Hospital
The main entrance at Lynn's Queen Elizabeth Hospital

Chief executive Caroline Shaw said: “People need to realise this is what has been seen and we cannot ignore it. We have to act upon it to make sure we continue to give good care to patients.

“Part of the challenge for this hospital is being in special measures because there is not enough staff in the job.

“It is really isolated and difficult to get here, which is why we are focusing on apprenticeships. We are really looking at recruitment and retention.”

Chief executive Caroline Shaw with professor Steve Barnett, the trust chairman
Chief executive Caroline Shaw with professor Steve Barnett, the trust chairman

Developing a new school of nursing to address the staff shortage is also being looked at.

Mrs Shaw added: “Maternity was an area with real concern and the report shows there have been improvements in that area.

“The NHS came in and said the achievements were palpable.”

Emphasis is being placed on the wellbeing of staff in order to improve the level of care and thereby help the hospital get out of special measures.

Mrs Shaw said internal awards are being awarded to hospital staff and volunteers with a presentation night taking place at the Knights Hill Hotel on Saturday, November 7.

There have been 408 nominations for the awards night which will also recognise the 300 volunteers at the hospital through a ‘Volunteer of the Year’ award.

“We have simple things like employer of the month and team of the week which celebrates some successes,” Mrs Shaw said.

“A report can make people feel very downhearted so it is about how we can retain staff.

“It really is a fabulous hospital, there is a passion for the local hospital we do not see in other places, and there is drive and energy to get us out of special measures.

“People were phoning in saying they did not recognise what was said in the [CQC inspection] report.”



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