Robins find a new use for Heacham recycling centre bin

Robins nesting in the door of textile recycling bin at the Heacham recycling centre.'Baby Robins (5 in total) waiting for the mother to return with food ANL-150806-074601009
Robins nesting in the door of textile recycling bin at the Heacham recycling centre.'Baby Robins (5 in total) waiting for the mother to return with food ANL-150806-074601009
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Staff at a West Norfolk recycling centre have been welcoming some new arrivals, and, on this occasion, they’re not rubbish.

Five young robins have hatched from a nest built in a textile bin at the facility in Heacham since Friday.

Robins nesting in the door of the textile recycling bin at the Heacham recycling centre.'Caroline Smith (recycling Advisor) at the Heacham centre, checking on the nest ANL-150806-074419009

Robins nesting in the door of the textile recycling bin at the Heacham recycling centre.'Caroline Smith (recycling Advisor) at the Heacham centre, checking on the nest ANL-150806-074419009

And Jess King, a household waste officer for Norfolk County Council, said the site is not the only one in the area to have become the home of some feathered friends.

She said: “We’ve currently got a nest at Wereham which the mother has built in a gas bottle.”

Workers at the Chalkpit Road site first discovered the nest around three weeks ago, although it is believed the mother may have been there for at least two weeks prior to that.

Miss King said the nest had been found during a routine daily check of the site.

The bin was then put out of use so the nest, which will remain in place for as long as it is needed, would not be disturbed.

A replacement bin has been brought in order to avoid disrupting services to the public.

The first of the eggs hatched on Friday and Miss King said the new arrivals had made quite an impression on the staff.

She said: “They just think it’s quite sweet. They quite like the fact they’re there.”

Bird charities say robins, which are currently in their breeding season, are famous for nesting in some unusual locations and Miss King said old tyres had also been used for nesting.

She said their countryside locations meant the centres were often popular with nesting birds.

She added: “The sites are quite rural and lines by hedges and trees.”