Home   News   Article

Plan for smaller King's Lynn Parkway housing scheme backed by West Norfolk councillors




Councillors have voted in favour of submitting a fresh planning application for a controversial development of hundreds of new homes in King’s Lynn.

West Norfolk Council had previously sought planning permission for 379 homes on land south of Parkway in Gaywood – but the plan came up against a petition signed by 3,500 people protesting the loss of a woodland habitat.

Members voted in favour of the Conservative cabinet’s recommendation to submit a more modest application for 228 homes at a meeting on Thursday afternoon.

GV Picture of Land which is being Proposed for Possible New Housing Development for the Gaywood Area...Land between King's Lynn Academy Site off Queen Mary Road/Parkway Gaywood and Howard Junior School. (45317510)
GV Picture of Land which is being Proposed for Possible New Housing Development for the Gaywood Area...Land between King's Lynn Academy Site off Queen Mary Road/Parkway Gaywood and Howard Junior School. (45317510)

Council leader Stuart Dark said the authority had a responsibility to ensure sufficient homes were available for King’s Lynn’s current and future residents.

But Labour councillor Christine Hudson said that even in its smaller form, the plan would still bring 600 cars to the neighbourhood.

She added that the council must investigate whether another exit from the site could be found to prevent congestion and “horrific” pollution.

The plan’s specifics will be detailed at the planning application stage.

Ten councillors voted against the plan, with three abstentions.

The original plans for the area were approved at a marathon planning session in April.

But environmental campaigners, who were concerned about the potential harm to sensitive wildlife habitats in the area, threatened to mount a legal challenge, and permission was never formally granted because of the requirement for legal agreements.

Proposals to develop a smaller proposal, without building on the habitat areas, were first outlined in June.

Reports at the time suggested the benefits of the original scheme might take longer than previously envisaged to be felt.



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More