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Seal on brink of death now on mend at RSPCA




Frisbee the seal
Frisbee the seal

A seal who was found on a beach with a frisbee embedded in her neck is said to be recovering well at RSPCA East Winch Wildlife Centre.

Frisbee, an adult female grey seal, has been in the care of RSPCA East Winch Wildlife Centre since September following her rescue by the Friends of Horsey Seals.

The Friends of Horsey Seals found that she had been swimming around with a yellow frisbee embedded in her neck for some six months.

RSPCA East Winch Wildlife Centre manager, Alison Charles, said: “Poor Frisbee was extremely emaciated when she first came to us as she just wouldn’t have been able to feed due to the restriction around her neck caused by the yellow frisbee. We’d never actually seen such an extensive wound and to be honest we just didn’t think she would be able to recover from it.

“However, she is certainly making up for it now and is eating us out of house and home. She’s a big seal and she’s getting through a huge amount of fish every day. But it is great to see.

“Even now, almost two-months on, her wound is still very visible and still has a long way to go before it is fully healed, but the good news is it is granulating well with antibiotics.”

Ms Charles said Frisbee was on the brink of death two months ago and it is “fantastic to think that she has come so far”.

She added: “Frisbee is also a fighter and you can see her getting stronger every day given that two months ago she was on the brink of death.

“She’s now been moved to an outside pool as she has improved so much and needs more space.

“We are doing all we can to get Frisbee back to the wild and, while she is doing so well, the wound is still deep and vulnerable to infection.

“It is heart-breaking to think that this could have been prevented if people just took extra care with their litter on the coastline. Many people are just unaware of the problems discarded litter can cause for our wildlife.”

Frisbee is likely to be in the centre’s care for another three months to give her wound more time to heal.



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