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DVLA text scam which tells drivers they've over paid vehicle tax and can claim a refund wants people's personal details



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Drivers are being warned not to reply to a scam text, pretending to be from the DVLA, which could risk costing them thousands of pounds.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency has put out a warning about scammers who are posing as the government department in an attempt to obtain people's personal bank details and commit further fraud.

One particular fraudulent text currently circulating tells motorists they've over paid their vehicle tax and that they're entitled to claim a refund.

The scam text circulating tells people they're entitled to a refund
The scam text circulating tells people they're entitled to a refund

The message, which suggests it's from the DVLA, explains that the organisation has recalculated a motorist's vehicle tax and that they're now entitled to some money back - with a specific amount included.

The suspect text then instructs people to click what they claim is a 'secure link' in order to claim the cash back.

People who input their personal details thinking they're getting a refund could find that their account is emptied, says the DVLA
People who input their personal details thinking they're getting a refund could find that their account is emptied, says the DVLA

DVLA officials have taken to social media to remind people of the importance of only ever using and communicating with the gov.uk website for its services or, it says, drivers risk scammers 'sneakily' stealing personal details to commit fraud.

And with the cost of living crisis leaving people watching every penny and pound it is thought fraudsters are attempting to exploit the situation with growing numbers of scams offering people money back or a financial deal too good to be true.

The DVLA says drivers should only use its website for its services
The DVLA says drivers should only use its website for its services

Select Car Leasing, which has been conducting its own research into a recent flurry of motoring scams says it estimates drivers could lose, on average, up to £5,000 each time if they're caught out.

Cars being sold and advertised through social media, cut-price and heavily discounted insurance deals and unlikely offers connected to the long wait for driving test appointments and driving licences are other potential themes for scams the company says motorists must be alert to.

A spokesman for Select Car Leasing explained: "If drivers enter their personal information, scammers could empty their bank account or use license details to commit major offences on their behalf."



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