Thousands of starfish wash up on Hunstanton beach

Thousands of starfish wash up on Hunstanton beach.  By Melissa Ibbitson from Lynn
Thousands of starfish wash up on Hunstanton beach. By Melissa Ibbitson from Lynn

Thousands of sea creatures have washed up dead on Hunstanton beach following the ‘Beast from the East’ and Storm Emma.

An expert from Hunstanton Sea Life Sanctuary says its not uncommon to find starfish and other sea creatures washed up on England’s coastline following a storm.

Thousands of starfish wash up on Hunstanton beach. By Melissa Ibbitson from Lynn

Thousands of starfish wash up on Hunstanton beach. By Melissa Ibbitson from Lynn

Deputy manage at Hunstanton Sea Life Sanctuary, Adam Makinson, said: “Starfish are not strong swimmers and live in relatively shallow water, once they have become dislodged from rocks they end up being carried by currents and often wash up on the shore. Starfish feed on molluscs, for instance mussels and clams, often congregating in large numbers.

“Unfortunately it’s not uncommon to find starfish washed up after a storm as the waves are too strong for them to stay anchored to rocks and the sea bed.

“As a result of the recent high tides and Storm Emma there has been an extended period of rough seas likely causing the mass stranding event we have witnessed this weekend.

“It’s never good to see marine creatures stranding, however with the recent storm and strong tides it was highly likely an event like this would occur.”

Thousands of starfish wash up on Hunstanton beach. By Melissa Ibbitson from Lynn

Thousands of starfish wash up on Hunstanton beach. By Melissa Ibbitson from Lynn

Sea creatures have been washing up on coastlines across England, with tens of thousands becoming stranded on sands in Kent.

On Twitter, a spokesman from West Norfolk Council said: “The borough council and other partner agencies are aware of a number of solid deposits that have recently appeared on the beach between Hunstanton and Old Hunstanton.

“Whilst there appears no immediate cause for concern, samples of the material have been taken for analysis. We would advise members of the public not to touch the objects and observe normal hygiene practices, such as washing hands after visiting the beach.

“We suggest those with children and animals take extra care to ensure they avoid contact with the objects.”