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Traffic warning as Highways raise concerns over council’s housing scheme application in Gaywood




Borough council chiefs are being urged to revise their plans for hundreds of new homes and a link road to a major Lynn business site.

Norfolk County Council Highways officials have raised concerns over West Norfolk Council’s application, which seeks to build 380 homes and a link to the Hardwick industrial estate.

The application concerns land off Queen Mary Road and Parkway in Gaywood.

General view picture of land which is being proposed for possible new housing development for the Gaywood area. Pictures: Paul Marsh
General view picture of land which is being proposed for possible new housing development for the Gaywood area. Pictures: Paul Marsh

Documents submitted in response to the application states the proposals could exacerbate traffic congestion around the Gaywood Clock, particularly during the evening rush hour.

Highways suggest the issue could be resolved by including a layout change to make the route less attractive to through traffic, or building a bus-gate at the bridge.

A list of demands have been submitted by Highways who have requested the application is not determined until these concerns are addressed.

Land next to the King's Lynn Academy Site off Queen Mary Road/Parkway, Gaywood. Pictures: Paul Marsh
Land next to the King's Lynn Academy Site off Queen Mary Road/Parkway, Gaywood. Pictures: Paul Marsh

This includes queries over how the council’s plans will discourage through traffic from using the narrow Swallowfield Road and Fernlea Road, where there are “significant levels” of on-street parking.

It also states these roads would not be suitable for a bus route as suggested by the application.

Highways also state no details have been provided concerning the replacement for the cyclepath bridge over the railway line which, they say, needs to be widened.

It continues: “The alignment of the main spine road from Parkway to the new bridge road is not appropriate for inclusion within a 20mph zone.

“Therefore, it will remain subject to a 30mph speed limit and all junctions and accesses from shared private drives/parking courts must have visibility splays.”

Concerns have been raised over the turning areas provided in front of individual properties on the eastern side, as well as the number of parking spaces throughout the site.

The letter, signed off by Dave Wilson, says: “The proposal seeks to provide a road connection between Parkway and Swallowfield Road, along with a bridge over the sand line and road connection to Rollesby Road.

“This would undoubtedly improve network resilience at these residential areas, particularly at Queen Mary Road which is a cul-de-sac serving two school sites and a large number of dwellings.

“Whilst provision of the infrastructure is welcomed, analysis of the provided traffic assessment modelling results suggests that traffic might be drawn up over the new bridge and exacerbate the existing network stress at Gaywood Clock.”

A council spokesman said the authority is aiming for the application to go before the planning committee in November, subject to change.

There are 154 objections to the application by the public, including one from Pallavi Devulapalli, a climate change activist and member of the Green Party.

She said: “The proposed road destroying a cycling path and a nature reserve adjacent to a primary school makes no sense whatsoever.

“We have lost huge amounts of natural habitats in West Norfolk- we cannot afford to lose any more.

“Please stop this absurd proposal and leave the green spaces alone. There are plenty of old brownfield sites to build on in Kings Lynn.”

Other public comments state the application will place enhanced strain on local services and increase the risk of accidents.

One objection from Susan Bruce describes the plans as a “rat run between Gaywood, Fairstead and Hardwick.”

She adds: “Gaywood Clock is already known to have a very high level of pollution and this will increase, not reduce, increasing health problems including asthma and breathing problems for people who live in the area.”

Destroyed wildlife is a recurring theme among objections.

The project is based around a split site either side of the King’s Oak Academy andHoward Junior School.



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