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TV presenter Simon Reeve on a mission in Ingoldisthorpe



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A television presenter has visited a school in West Norfolk and the children joined him in filming for a new water saving campaign.

Children at Ingoldisthorpe CofE VA Primary School accompanied the travel presenter Simon Reeve, passionate about conservation and film crew on a Journey Of Water walk.

The educational walk for the campaign is a new initiative from dishwasher brand Finish and Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF), the world’s leading independent conservation organisation.

Television presenter Simon Reeve visits Ingoldisthorpe Primary School promoting the new water saving campaign led by WWF and the dishwasher company Finish. Pictured Simon Reeve at Ingoldisthorpe wetlands at the Water Recycling Centre. MLNF-22MF50177
Television presenter Simon Reeve visits Ingoldisthorpe Primary School promoting the new water saving campaign led by WWF and the dishwasher company Finish. Pictured Simon Reeve at Ingoldisthorpe wetlands at the Water Recycling Centre. MLNF-22MF50177

The walk was organised by the Finish and WWF partnership which is replenishing 500 million litres of freshwater in East Anglia across three years.

It took place at a constructed wetland managed by the Norfolk River Trust, WWF’s local delivery partner.

Meeting at the water recycling centre just up the road from the school, groups of children learned about the importance of the area they live in.

Travel presenter Simon Reeve is an ambassador for WWF and a passionate conservationist. MLNF-22MF50179
Travel presenter Simon Reeve is an ambassador for WWF and a passionate conservationist. MLNF-22MF50179

Having been involved in the project to rewild the area a few years ago the children have been fully involved with the process of restoring their immediate environment.

Headteacher Sean Wright said: "The children came here in 2018 to start this project and have been involved ever since with this amazing project.

"We now see species of shrimp, dragon flies and water voles and so much more wildlife than before.

Simon Reeve answers questions from Ingoldisthorpe C of E pupils as they accompany him and a film crew on a Journey Of Water walk at the Water Recycling Centre. MLNF-22MF50180
Simon Reeve answers questions from Ingoldisthorpe C of E pupils as they accompany him and a film crew on a Journey Of Water walk at the Water Recycling Centre. MLNF-22MF50180

"The children are aware of what is around them and some of these children originally came to do the planting.

"We are an outdoor school and do a lot of learning outside and how important it is to look after our environment.

"We also grow our own herbs, plants, fruit and vegetables in the school."

Jonah Tosney, operations director of Rivers Norfolk, pictured leading school pupils at Ingoldisthorpe Wetlands. MLNF-22MF50184
Jonah Tosney, operations director of Rivers Norfolk, pictured leading school pupils at Ingoldisthorpe Wetlands. MLNF-22MF50184

The campaign is being led by Finish and the Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) who are working together to replenish 500 million litres of freshwater in East Anglia, one of the UK’s most water stressed regions, and encouraging sustainable water use at home

WWF ambassador Simon attended the Journey of Water walk in to help the children better understand where water in their taps comes from, why water is such a precious resource and how water can be saved at home.

He said: "It has been brilliant attending the Journey of Water walk with Ingoldisthorpe Primary School.

Lynn News Reporter Jenny Beake with Simon Reeve at Ingoldisthorpe Wetlands.. MLNF-22MF50186
Lynn News Reporter Jenny Beake with Simon Reeve at Ingoldisthorpe Wetlands.. MLNF-22MF50186

"It is important that children know where the water in their taps comes from and that is a lifeline for so many ecosystems.

"Few realise that freshwater in East Anglia is under strain which is why it is vital we are mindful of the amount of water used at home to help protect these precious environments."

Finish is funding restoration and replenishment projects which will be delivered by conservation experts WWF.

Television presenter Simon Reeve visits Ingoldisthorpe Primary School promoting a water saving campaign at Ingoldisthorpe Wetlands. MLNF-22MF50187
Television presenter Simon Reeve visits Ingoldisthorpe Primary School promoting a water saving campaign at Ingoldisthorpe Wetlands. MLNF-22MF50187

East Anglia is one of the UK’s most water stressed regions and the UK could face a water scarce future in as little as 25 years due to climate change and rising demand for water if action is not taken.

The campaign is raising awareness of where our water comes from, how it links to freshwater environments, such as wetlands, rivers, and streams and why they need protecting.

The walk event brought these topics to life and allowed the schoolchildren to experience freshwater up close and learn from a variety of experts.

Pictured from left to right: Claudia Weston, Michelle Larfed and Laura Davidson. MLNF-22MF50190
Pictured from left to right: Claudia Weston, Michelle Larfed and Laura Davidson. MLNF-22MF50190

East Anglia is one of the UK’s most water stressed regions and Finish and WWF are working to replenish East Anglian freshwater and raise awareness about the issue.

It was specially designed to take the children through the journey of water, bringing to life key stages of the water cycle and how freshwater travels from its source to the taps in our homes.

The activities included exploring a constructed wetland and local river while spotting wildlife that live in these habitats.

Television presenter Simon Reeve paid a visit to Ingoldisthorpe C of E school. MLNF-22MF50192
Television presenter Simon Reeve paid a visit to Ingoldisthorpe C of E school. MLNF-22MF50192

The journey ended with a session about how water arrives in our homes, how water might be wasted at home and the simple steps that can be taken to save water, such as turning off taps, having shorter showers and skipping the pre-rinse if using a dishwasher.

East Anglia is the driest region in the UK and considered by the Environment Agency to be ‘seriously water stressed’.

This means that there is no additional water available to meet demand and in some areas water abstraction can damage ecosystems.

The Environment Agency also predicts that the UK could face serious water shortages in the next 25 years as a result of climate change and growing demand, unless action is taken.

Conor Linstead, freshwater specialist, WWF-UK said: "The effects of climate change and growing demand for water are putting freshwater sources in East Anglia under strain."

"The walk aimed to educate young people about the vital importance of UK freshwater and how they can help conserve it.

"Beyond this, Finish and WWF are replenishing 500 million litres of freshwater in East Anglia through innovative projects such as constructed wetlands that improve water quality and allow species such as dragonflies and trout to thrive."

Steph Lilley, sales director UK and Ireland, Finish said: "We are putting our purpose in action through the Journey of Water campaign and our support for the WWF-led replenishment work in East Anglia which is helping to protect UK water sources.

"As a leader in dishwashing solutions, we are on a mission to help raise awareness of the importance of saving water at home.

"For instance, few people are aware that by not pre-rinsing dishes before loading a dishwasher you can save on average 1,000 litres of water a year or that using a dishwasher instead of handwashing people can save 6,800 litres of water a year."

The Journey of Water walk was also designed to help connect local children with the freshwater in their region and create a greater sense of appreciation for these environments.

Jonah Tosney, operations director, Norfolk River Trust said: "The walk was a fantastic way to show first-hand the freshwater environments that exists in the region and the wildlife it supports.

"We often find through our educational programmes that many children know more about the Amazon river than they do about the River Bure or the Norfolk Broads which are on their doorstep.

"We believe it is important that young people understand the natural origins of their water so they can protect it for generations to come."

A year five pupil at Ingoldisthorpe CE school said: "I really I like wildlife and I am very in to animals and this is a nice opportunity to come here and learn.

"Half of the things I didn't actually know and it is nice to see the plants growing that we actually helped plant."

Another pupil said: "Because we were here when we were younger it is really cool to come back and see how much plants have grown, to see the trails and the animals and what they like to eat."



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