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Vaccine proof 'to be required to work in Norfolk care homes'




New rules requiring people working at care homes in West Norfolk to prove they have had both their coronavirus vaccinations have been announced today.

County council chiefs say the measures, which would mean barring those unable to prove their vaccine status except in limited circumstances, are necessary to help protect residents from the virus.

But, although they are not due to come into force until November, affected workers will need to have had their first dose within days to avoid being barred from entering.

People working in care homes are being advised to get vaccinated now, or risk being locked out of their workplaces in a few weeks' time.
People working in care homes are being advised to get vaccinated now, or risk being locked out of their workplaces in a few weeks' time.

The rules will apply to anyone working in a care home registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC), whether they are directly employed staff, agency workers, volunteers or people in other roles such as inspectors, health professionals or hairdressers.

The only exemptions will be for people who are medically exempt and those provided emergency assistance or carrying out urgent repairs.

Bill Borrett, Norfolk County Council's cabinet member for adult social care, said today: “The mandatory vaccine regulations will help to ensure that all care home residents, who may be vulnerable to COVID-19 are better protected against the virus.

“We also hope that the local businesses, who are valued providers of services to our care homes across the region, will be able to support us with this new requirement.”

The rules are due to be implemented from November 11, meaning that people who have not had a single vaccination will need to have their first dose by next Thursday, September 16, so they are not affected.

The announcement follows plans unveiled by the Scottish Government earlier this week to make vaccination proof a condition of entry to crowded venues such as nightclubs and sports grounds.

The UK Government has also indicated it may look at imposing similar rules if it is felt they are needed on public health grounds.



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