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King's Lynn teenager sends out warning after puppy dies



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An 18-year-old is grieving after her 12-week-old puppy died after a walk on the beach over the weekend.

Lynn resident Erin McGonigle sadly had to see her Labrador Rottweiler cross breed called Harley put to sleep yesterday after the dog was taken to the vets.

It is suspected the dog became ill on Saturday morning after walking on the beach at Old Hunstanton.

Harley, a 12-week-old puppy had to be put to sleep after contracting toxic poisoning in West Norfolk. Picture: SUBMITTED
Harley, a 12-week-old puppy had to be put to sleep after contracting toxic poisoning in West Norfolk. Picture: SUBMITTED

Erin believes there is possibility it might be similar to the Seasonal Canine Illness (SCI) which saw three dogs pass away after visiting the Sandringham Estate.

Erin said: "We had a lovely day on Saturday. Harley was eating sand like a normal puppy would and when we got home after the beach he was instantly sick then he was alright after a while."

The teenager said she wants other dog owners to be aware after losing her much-loved companion.

Harley, a 12-week-old puppy, had to be put to sleep after contracting toxic poisoning in West Norfolk. Picture: SUBMITTED
Harley, a 12-week-old puppy, had to be put to sleep after contracting toxic poisoning in West Norfolk. Picture: SUBMITTED

After being sick multiple times during the night, the puppy was taken to the vets on Sunday morning where they initially thought it was a blockage.

But Harley then had diarrhoea and it was confirmed he had toxic poisoning rather than a blockage.

In tribute to Harley, Erin said: "He was a lovely, playful little pup who had bundles of joy with his toys. He learnt how to sit first try. He chewed everything but don’t they all. He will truly missed and loved forever. Also he was named Harley after the motorbike as we are a biker family."



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