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'We want others to follow our lead on climate change', says council as green heat work begins at second King's Lynn site




Council leaders in West Norfolk say they are trying to lead by example on climate change, as work to install greener heating systems in public buildings continues.

The borough secured nearly £4 million worth of government grants to fund decarbonisation work at council facilities earlier this year.

And contractors are now on site at the Dutton Pavilion, near Lynnsport, digging a trench that will allow a collector loop that enables a cleaner heating system to be used.

Groundworks taking place to install a collector loop to heat the Dutton pavillion..Left to right....Paul Kunes, Guy Ransom, John Psaila and Robert Wiseman. (48984692)
Groundworks taking place to install a collector loop to heat the Dutton pavillion..Left to right....Paul Kunes, Guy Ransom, John Psaila and Robert Wiseman. (48984692)

The ground works are expected to be completed soon.

And West Norfolk Council's environment portfolio holder, Paul Kunes, told the authority's latest meeting last Thursday that he hopes other organisations will follow its lead.

During public questions, Alastair Kent asked what the council was doing to stop excessive emissions of carbon dioxide.

He said a study by the Tindle Centre concluded the borough can only emit eight million tonnes of the gas between now and 2050 to meet its share of the UK's net zero carbon target and was on course to use up that amount in just eight years.

Mr Kunes replied: "We only have limited powers of what we can effect and the action plan we’ve put forward is to put the council’s house in order and reduce the emissions we produce.

"We are trying to lead by example with the ground source heat pumps we’re installing, but we’re limited in what we can do in the entire borough.

"We can lobby and we can lead by example on these issues and that’s what we’re trying to do."

He added that discussions were also taking place on how to conduct public consultations on the council's climate change strategy, which was first outlined last autumn.

The council's Re:Fit programme to reduce carbon emissions from its buildings began in the spring with the drilling of bore holes to enable ground source heat pumps to be used at its Hardwick depot.

Officials say planning is already underway to conduct similar work at Lynnsport, the South Lynn Community Centre, and the Oasis centre in Hunstanton.



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