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West Norfolk Council makes food waste reduction pledge




Council leaders in West Norfolk have backed a new plan designed to cut food waste and carbon emissions.

The borough council yesterday signed the Courtauld Commitment 2025, which aims to cut the carbon, water and waste associated with food and drink production by at least a fifth over the next decade.

The agreement was signed at the King's Lynn Food Bank's distribution centre in St Margaret's Lane.

Councillor Ian Devereux, (Cabinet member for Environment at the Borough Council of King's Lynn & West Norfolk and Borough Councillor for the Snettisham Ward),signing the Courtauld 2025 commitment at King’s Lynn Foodbank on Tuesday 24 September 2019, along with Helen Gilbert (Project Manager for the King's Lynn Foodbank).. (17422975)
Councillor Ian Devereux, (Cabinet member for Environment at the Borough Council of King's Lynn & West Norfolk and Borough Councillor for the Snettisham Ward),signing the Courtauld 2025 commitment at King’s Lynn Foodbank on Tuesday 24 September 2019, along with Helen Gilbert (Project Manager for the King's Lynn Foodbank).. (17422975)

And Ian Devereux, the authority's cabinet member for environment, said he was "proud" to be involved.

He said: “Signing the commitment here, at King’s Lynn Foodbank, is symbolic as the work they carry out is vital in supporting local residents and an excellent example of not letting food go to waste.”

Participants in the scheme, which is led by the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP), are expected to commit to identifying and developing good practice and promoting anti-waste initiatives.

The new reuse shop at Heacham's recycling centre (17507112)
The new reuse shop at Heacham's recycling centre (17507112)

They are also expected to provide an annual report to WRAP on the progress they have made in tackling the issue.

The borough's signing ceremony came just weeks after the Food Bank revealed it was facing unprecedented demand for its services.

Officials estimate they have already helped as many people this year as they did in the whole of 2018 and say they need more help from the public to continue their work than ever before.

The borough council's commitment follows a similar move by Norfolk County Council earlier this year.

Two new reuse shops, which the authority says prevent hundreds of tonnes of reusable items from being thrown away each year, have now been set up at recycling centres in Heacham and Wereham.

And, this week, reusable cups were introduced at the council's Norwich headquarters, instead of single use plastic ones.

Andy Grant, county cabinet member for environment and waste, said: "This is the first of what I hope will be many changes we’ll see from the council, people and businesses across the county to further cut waste and reuse more.”

Independent councillor Sandra Squire, who has been an active campaigner against single use plastics, said she was "absolutely thrilled" by the move.

Elsewhere, County Hall staff are being invited to join a Food Savvy lunch challenge, in which people go for a month without any single use packaging at lunchtime.

And the authority says cut-price compost bins are available at all of the county's recycling centres.



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