‘Work with me to save CAB’, pleads King’s Lynn councillor

Borough Councillor Ian Gourlay at Home for Health Feature ENGANL00120130813114741
Borough Councillor Ian Gourlay at Home for Health Feature ENGANL00120130813114741
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Council chiefs have been urged to work with campaigners to help secure the future of Lynn’s Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) branch.

Officials announced in March that the St Nicholas Street facility would close on June 1, following what they claimed was the loss of funding from West Norfolk Council.

Talks have taken place between the two sides since then and the authority maintains it does have funding in place to fund services the CAB currently provides.

But, amid continuing uncertainty over its future, the fight to save the service was taken into the borough council chamber during its latest meeting on Thursday.

During questions to the outgoing council leader, Nick Daubney, Labour’s Ian Gourlay said: “It’s essential we have a fully functioning CAB in King’s Lynn.

“We want this to be a key town in East Anglia and we don’t want half-measures.

“Can you please work with me and the new leader to ensure we have a fully functioning CAB? The campaign is not going to give up.”

But Mr Daubney said: “We have the resources to ensure the service is as strong as ever.

“I don’t see it as our job to ensure the CAB does this, or that.

“I want to make sure the service is there and the best people to deliver it deliver it and the people who need it get a first class, robust service.”

Mr Daubney said it was in the council’s interest to ensure that services were available to help people that have used the CAB for support on debt, housing and other issues.

But he said the council needed debt and housing support to be delivered more on site, because those cases were often looked into by council staff aswell.

He added that Norfolk County Council’s funding of the service, believed to be around £70,000, was expected to continue.

A petition calling for the CAB to be saved, set up on the change.org campaign website, has now been signed by more than 650 people.